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Completion of this Project is a Guaranteed National Winner!!!

Washington State Democratic Party is

the Progressive Party of

President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Watch the videos at You Tube (You tube only has 10 min. videos and we had to split it up into 3 segments)


Part One: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLVedF98S1A

Part Two: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlWSXU0ru9Y

Part Three: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyLjzCyped8


Here's a television interview that Stockwell gave in Kennewick:


Please watch my project video during my run for the

9th Legislative given at Charter Channel 3Kennewick, Wa. Thank you for your extra help Lloyd Swain (Jimmy Newland would be proud of his protege) & Nick Wagoner!


http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=PdRRTRgodWc&feature=digest

Rose Honsa & Glen Stockwell

Helping out at Spokane Democratic

Fair Booth 2009

ROOSEVELT UNDERSTOOD THE POWER OF A PUBLIC OPTION


By ADAM COHEN


Published: November 30, 2009


As governor of New York, Franklin D. Roosevelt crusaded for “public power,” government-owned electric plants. He was outraged by the high prices that monopolistic utility companies were charging and by their refusal to bring electricity to rural parts of the state, which, they said, could not be done economically. Public plants, Roosevelt said, could bring power to those who needed it and serve as a yardstick for measuring and keeping in check the prices charged by private power companies.


Many decades later, a major point of contention in the debate over health insurance reform is the so-called public option, a government-run program that would compete with private insurers. Critics have tried to paint it as a wild-eyed experiment, but it echoes F.D.R.’s battles for public power — in fact, the entire New Deal he later created. The argument Roosevelt made — that a government program could fix the flaws in a poorly functioning private market — applies with even more force in health care.

In the early 20th century, electricity was a hot political issue. It was expensive and did not reach many parts of the country. To Roosevelt, it was an important social justice issue. “When he talked about the benefits of cheap electricity he did not think in terms of kilowatts,” a top adviser said. “He thought in terms of the hired hand milking by electricity, the farm wife’s pump, stove, lights and sewing machine.”

When he ran for president in 1932, Roosevelt made public power a cornerstone of his campaign. In a speech in Portland, Ore., he explained that it could be a “birch rod in the cupboard,” which the citizenry could use to punish private power companies that were gouging the public or not providing good service. Critics accused Roosevelt of Bolshevism, but he was not deterred. Public power was no more radical, he said, than the public mail.

F.D.R. championed public power as president. During his first 100 days in office, he backed a bill to create the Tennessee Valley Authority, a federal authority that brought affordable electricity to an impoverished 40,000-square-mile stretch of the rural South.

Roosevelt had hoped to create other projects like the T.V.A., to establish yardstick pricing power on a national scale, but it proved to be a heavier logistical and political lift than he expected. In 1935, he brought government into the electricity business in another way. By executive order, he created the Rural Electrification Administration, which used federal money and local farm co-ops to lay electric lines in parts of the country that private companies had no interest in serving. The R.E.A. drove down electricity prices and helped bring lighting, sewing machines and radios to the 90 percent of rural Americans who were without them.

The whole New Deal was in a sense just a series of public options, some more optional than others, that offered government as an alternative to the often-flawed private market. The Farm Credit Administration and the Home Owners’ Loan Act used government funds to save farms and homes of Americans who would have been foreclosed on by private lenders. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation saved the private banking system by insuring savings accounts, which made the public willing to put money back in private banks. Social Security, all public and no option, rescued older Americans from living their final years in poverty.

A public option for health care could work much like the yardstick Roosevelt envisioned public power becoming. A publicly run health care program could compete with private insurance companies, which have a record of overcharging and underperforming.

Private health insurers and their allies in Congress argue that government is too inept to run a health insurance program and that it will be too costly. Actually, government already does that — for the military and in Medicare and Medicaid. As for cost, opponents of the public option may fear it would work too well — that to compete, private insurers would have to keep their prices down and the quality of their services up.

The private insurers and lawmakers who oppose the public option also claim it would be a radical break from how things have been done in this country. In reality, it follows directly from the New Deal tradition that created many of the mainstays of American society.

Tom Forbes, Website | Red County Whitman County (WA)


Has written a very professional overview of the Ninth

District Legislative Race


http://www.redcounty.com/eastwashington


Stockwell also has a website up here where he goes into

more detail about himself and his Columbia Basin Project

proposal. Personally, like most fiscal conservatives, I am

horrified that Obama is "handing out money like it has

never happened in our history." There is obviously no

thought being given as to how all the"stimulus" will be

paid for and the consequences that will have down the

road.


But, I happen to agree with Stockwell that as long as the money is being handed out, it might as well be spent on something that will actually create jobs and provide a public benefit, not frittered away on other projects such as street resurfacing and rural Internet access that have created absolutely no new jobs.


Tom Forbes, Website | Red County Whitman County (WA)

wrote this comment on his July 22, Blog Check his total

editorial at http://www.redcounty.com/eastwashington


If the Democrats in the 9th LD are truly interested in sending

someone to Olympia, it is going to have to be someone like Glen Stockwell, just as it took "Blue Dog" Walt Minnick to crack the Republican stranglehold in Idaho's 1st Congressional District.


The last time a Democrat represented the 9th in the House, it was during the Great Depression and the time

of, you guessed it, the Columbia Basin Project.


Glen may be a bit too conservative, populist, outspoken, and earthy for the cultured, urban tastes of the ultra-leftist WSU academics that run the Whitman County Democratic Party, but his background and political views are much more in line with the vast majority of voters in the 9th. Pelz's brand of Seattle Democratic politics will never play in Othello or Colfax.


Glen Stockwell devoted his opening statement to his primary issue of completing the Columbia Basin Project. #wcot#pullman7:20 PM Jul 29th from TwitterBerrypalousitics Tom Forbes

____________________________________________

Cheney Free Press 1616 W. First St. · Cheney · WA · 99004

Phone: (509) 235-6184 NEWS


By JOHN McCALLUM

Editor


If you’re a supporter of Cheney’s Tom Trulove, Mike

McKeehan or Medical Lake’s John Higgins, you’re

probably feeling pretty good.


The three candidates emerged as the top vote getters – all with comfortable margins – in their respect local

government races after the first count of primary ballots on Tuesday night.


With 88 percent of received ballots (71,062) counted

countywide, 10,000 total remaining to be tabulated,

Trulove has emerged as the front-runner in the Cheney mayoral race, nabbing 501 votes, 44 percent. What remains to be seen is who will be his challenger as first-term incumbent Mayor Allan Gainer was in second with 333 votes, 29.29 percent, and City Councilman Curt Huff in third just 30 votes back, 26.65 percent.


The biggest surprise of the primary may be coming out of the 9th Legislative District’s state representative Position No. 1 race. Ritzville businessman Glen Stockwell, the only Democrat among the five candidates, was narrowly in

third place district-wide at press time on Tuesday, receiving 25.24 percent of the vote, 4,694

ballots.


Stockwell,has been in a battle with Whitman County

Democratic Party officials, who haven’t stepped forward

to endorse his campaign, questioning whether or not he is truly a Democrat since he last ran for the legislative seat in 2006 as a Republican.


Stockwell trails second-place Pat Hailey from Mesa in

Franklin County. Hailey, wife of the late Steve Hailey who was elected to the seat in 2006, but passed away from cancer in December 2008, had 25.64 percent of the vote, 4,769 ballots, helped by a strong showing in her home county with 83.31 percent, and Adams County with 50.40 percent.


Pullman’s Susan Fagan was the front-runner, receiving 5,357 votes, 28.81 percent.

In Spokane County, Stockwell was leading, receiving

1,812 votes, almost 32 percent, with Fagan second with 1,546 votes, 27.12 percent, and Hailey third with 986 votes, 16.98 percent.


The top-two vote getters in all races advance to the

November general election. The primary will be certified on Sept. 2.


John McCallum can be reached at


[email protected]


Stockwell trails second-place Pat Hailey from Mesa in

Franklin County. Hailey, wife of the late Steve Hailey who was elected to the seat in 2006, but passed away from cancer in December 2008, had 25.64 percent of the vote, 4,769 ballots, helped by a strong showing in her home county with 83.31 percent, and Adams County with 50.40 percent. Stockwell trails second-place Pat Hailey from

Mesa in Franklin County. Hailey, wife of the late Steve Hailey who was elected to the seat in 2006, but passed away from cancer in December 2008, had 25.64 percent

of the vote, 4,769 ballots, helped by a strong showing in her home county with 83.31 percent, and Adams County with 50.40 percent.


Stockwell trails second-place Pat Hailey from Mesa in

Franklin County. Hailey, wife of the late Steve Hailey who was elected to the seat in 2006, but passed away from cancer in December 2008, had 25.64 percent of the vote, 4,769 ballots, helped by a strong showing in her home county with 83.31 percent, and Adams County with 50.40 percent. Pullman’s Susan Fagan was the front-runner, receiving 5,357 votes, 28.81 percent.


In Spokane County, Stockwell was leading, receiving 1,812 votes, almost 32 percent, with Fagan second with 1,546 votes, 27.12 percent, and Hailey third with 986 votes, 16.98 percent.

____________________________________________________________

Below is my radio interview with Radio Talk Show Host,

Mr. Adam Assenberg 92.5 FM in Moscow, Idaho


http://www.marijuanafactorfiction.org/krfp-shows-080109on.htm


2nd Largest Washington State Construction Project in 50 Years!

"The Columbia Basin Project"

Join with Me and please

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